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Bryan White rescues Mowzey Radio with Shs25m towards hospital bill

Nelson Bwire Kapo

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Kampala socialite Bryan White has started from where he left before being jailed, the man’s money bags are back in town.

The socialite caused a standstill at Buganda Road yesterday as he trekked with a team of journalists, fans and parasites to Case Clinic, where singer Mowzey Radio has been hospitalised since Monday.

On reaching the hospital, Bryan White held a press conference which was wilfully attended by a few medical personnel and Radio’s mother.

He then announced that he was taking charge of Radio’s bills going forward, and as commitment, he cashed down Shs25m.

White also with the same excitement ordered that the doctor taking good care of Radio be given Shs 5m at once.

It should be noted that Radio had run out of money after his ( and of course Weasel’s )account got depleted in the first bill installments. The group were now looking forward to any other source of revenue as even their shows scheduled during the period Radio has been in coma can not continue.

Singer Mowzey Radio in coma

 

 

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Health

Scientists Using Polio To Treat Brain Cancer

Nile Post News

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There’s an exciting new breakthrough in treating some types of deadly brain tumors, that uses, of all things, a polio virus. Doctors at Duke Health in North Carolina genetically altered the virus because it produces such a strong immune response in our bodies. The result is a longer life for patients whose brain cancer returned. All had glioblastoma, an aggressive and lethal type of brain cancer. Of the 61 patients in the study, 21 percent who got this new treatment had were alive three years later.

While that number is low, the survival rate for glioblastoma is normally even lower, usually, a year and a half after diagnosis. The researchers compared the study group to a group of patients drawn from historical cases at Duke. Only four percent of these patients survived three years after treatment.

Dr. Annick Desjardins, one of the authors, said not all patients respond, but if they do, they often become long-term survivors. Desjardins said, “The big question is, how can we make sure that everybody responds?”

Stephanie Hopper was the first patient in the Duke study. She was diagnosed with glioblastoma eight years ago. She had the tumor removed, but two years later, it returned. The modified virus is directly injected into the brain during surgery. After treatment, Hopper’s tumor shrunk to the point where it’s barely noticeable in her brain scans, and the tumor is continuing to shrink.

Dr. Darell Bigner is the senior author of the study which was published in the New England Journal of Medicine. He explained that by modifying the virus, it destroyed its ability to infect nerve cells and cause polio, but the virus retained the ability to kill cancer cells. In fact, the modified virus targeted the tumor cells.

Prior to the study, the researchers decided they needed a different approach to treating glioblastomas which is why they looked at experimenting with the polio virus.

One of the goals of a phase one trial is to find a dose that is safe. In some patients, the therapy caused their brains to swell and they experienced seizures and other bad side effects so the dose was lowered. Study participants were selected according to the size of their recurring tumor, its location in the brain and other factors designed for patient protection.

For five of the 61 patients in the trial, the cancer returned. They were treated a second time and Bigner says, “Those that we’ve been able to follow long enough have responded to the treatment the second time. That’s extremely important.” Combining the polio virus with other approved therapies is one approach already being tested at Duke to improve survival.

The researchers are continuing their work on treating glioblastomas and planning other studies as well. They want to test the therapy on children’s brain tumors. The therapy may also expand beyond brain tumors to include breast cancer and melanoma patient as well.

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Global Watch

US Military Aims for $1B Missile Defense Radar in Hawaii

Nile Post News

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The U.S. military wants to install missile defense radar in Hawaii to identify any ballistic missiles that are fired from North Korea or elsewhere, officials said Tuesday.

The $1 billion system would spot warheads on missiles headed for Hawaii and other U.S. states, and provide that information to ground-based interceptors in Alaska designed to shoot them down. It would be able to distinguish warheads from decoys that are designed to trick missile defense systems.

The radar would help give the Alaska missiles “better eyes,” said Sen. Brian Schatz, a Democrat from Hawaii and a supporter of the project.

So far, lawmakers have appropriated $61 million for planning but not funds for construction. Schatz, who serves on the defense subcommittee of the Senate Appropriations Committee, said he doesn’t have much doubt about the likelihood of follow-on funding.

The radar would be about 30 to 50 feet (9 to 15 meters) wide and 60 feet to 80 feet (18 to 24 meters) high, according to the Missile Defense Agency.

It will likely to have a flat-face surface like one in Shemya, Alaska, instead of a ball-like appearance of other military radar. Experts say the larger the face, the more precisely it will be able to distinguish between warheads and decoys.

The agency is studying two possible locations for the radar, both of which are on Oahu’s North Shore. It’s collecting public comment through July 16.

Schatz said lawmakers discussed the radar with the previous commander of U.S. forces in the Pacific, Adm. Harry Harris, who recently retired and has been nominated to be the U.S. ambassador to South Korea.

“We already have robust capabilities, but working with Admiral Harris, we wanted to double down and make sure we have the most powerful combination of missile interceptors and radar systems anywhere,” Schatz said in a phone interview.

The radar would help identify long-range ballistic missile threats mid-way through flight.

David Santoro, a director and senior fellow for nuclear policy at the Pacific Forum think tank in Honolulu, said threats from North Korea were increasing as Pyongyang developed more sophisticated missiles and nuclear weapons.

“Over the past few weeks, we have seen a so-called peace initiative developing, but the reality is the threat is still there. It’s not going away,” Santoro said. The U.S. would be expected to build a radar system to counter the threats, he said.

U.S. concerns about the threat from North Korean missiles spiked last year as North Korea test-fired long-range missile over Japan and threatened to launch ballistic missiles toward the Guam, a major U.S. military hub in the Pacific. President Donald Trump warned the U.S. military was “locked and loaded, should North Korea act unwisely” and that the U.S. would unleash “fire and fury” on the North if it continued to threaten America.

But then Trump and North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong Un, met in Singapore earlier this month and issued a declaration agreeing to “work toward complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.”

The statement did not define a process, say when it would begin or say how long it might take.

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Africa

UN Accuses Burundi’s Ruling Party of Mass Human Rights Violations

Nile Post News

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A United Nations probe into the human rights situation in Burundi finds government opponents are subject to mass violations including summary executions, disappearances, arbitrary arrests and torture.

Burundian President Pierre Nkurunziza’s recent declaration that he will support the future President of the Republic when his mandate ends in 2020 has been welcomed by several countries. But, in its latest report, the U.N. Commission of Inquiry on Burundi casts doubt on the credibility of Nkurunziza’s declaration noting it lacks a clear and firm commitment by the sitting leader not to run for president in the upcoming elections.

Commission member Francoise Hampson says the situation in Burundi remains very disturbing. Since the beginning of the year, she says the commission has documented human rights violations targeting those opposed to the proposed amendment of the constitution.

“In particular, the commission has received reports of numerous arrests of people who called for a “no” vote in the referendum, who sought to meet to discuss the draft amendment of the Constitution, or who refused to join the CNDD-FDD,” she said. “The detentions that followed these arrests resulted in cases of torture and ill-treatment.”

The CNDD-FDD, short for the National Council of the Defense of Democracy-Forces for the Defense of Democracy, is Burundi’s ruling party.

Despite widespread opposition, Burundi, last month voted for a constitutional change potentially allowing the president to remain in power until 2034. The Commission says it has received information on people who were executed or abducted because they were members of opposition parties or refused to join the ruling party.

The investigators blame the Imbonerakure, the youth wing of the ruling party, for being behind most human rights violations during the referendum campaign and of harassing, controlling, and intimidating the population, forcing many to flee the country.

Burundi Ambassador Renovat Tabu accuses the Commission of lacking objectivity. He says its report is politically biased and is based on a campaign of disinformation. He says his country reserves the right to bring to justice those who defame the government.

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